edwardspoonhands:

todaywegiveourselvestothefire:

Nerdfighteria, I give you a puppy-sized elephant. 

Either that or an apatosaurus-sized human.

edwardspoonhands:

todaywegiveourselvestothefire:

Nerdfighteria, I give you a puppy-sized elephant. 

Either that or an apatosaurus-sized human.

4,876 notes   •   October 09 2012, 03:32 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
airpunchingacademic:

So, my friend made these earrings.
Out of recycled ethernet cable.
Because she’s awesome.
And now she’s selling them on etsy for other nerdfighters.
Available in blue, green, and orange.
$5 off when you use the coupon code ‘anglerfish’!
Link here! [x]

airpunchingacademic:

So, my friend made these earrings.

Out of recycled ethernet cable.

Because she’s awesome.

And now she’s selling them on etsy for other nerdfighters.

Available in blue, green, and orange.

$5 off when you use the coupon code ‘anglerfish’!

Link here! [x]

556 notes   •   September 05 2012, 06:32 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#image   #jewelry   #dftba   #crafts   #Nerdfighteria   #nerdfighters   

So my Maureen Johnson and Hank Green T-shirts came in today. I was taking them out of the package when this happened:

vondell-swain:

clockworkreveur:

(Not sure if this is Mullet Maureen or Mullet Hank)

But of course that led to me doing this:

After which of course I had to pull out my Pizza John shirt and do all these:

Unfortunately Pizza John is in a slightly larger scale, but I found it rather amusing anyways!

top john plus bottom hank is absolutely terrifying

2,284 notes   •   September 04 2012, 11:31 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
pretendisaidsomethingdeep:

Behold what I and lumosnox44 had found on the wall of a downtown cafe in Alexandria, Egypt.
Hoo ha Nerdfighters all over the world!!

pretendisaidsomethingdeep:

Behold what I and lumosnox44 had found on the wall of a downtown cafe in Alexandria, Egypt.

Hoo ha Nerdfighters all over the world!!

3,153 notes   •   August 30 2012, 01:37 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

Huh. unfathomablestars.tumblr.com is taken. 

Well, it is a good quote.

fishingboatproceeds:

The weapon we have is love.
Happy Esther Day, everyone.

fishingboatproceeds:

The weapon we have is love.

Happy Esther Day, everyone.

1,729 notes   •   August 03 2012, 10:43 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
fishingboatproceeds:

Everybody was told to make a funny face, but I didn’t get the memo.
Esther Earl would’ve been 18 tomorrow, a real adult. I miss her. 
It’s very easy to turn the dead into Lessons for the Living—to say that Esther taught me to Live Life or To Be Grateful or Not To Take Beauty for Granted. But honestly, in my opinion at least, any lessons learned from her death could’ve been learned in some other, easier way. I think the universe overall would be better off if she were still making videos.
I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died. 
She was young, blessed with a genuinely sophomoric sense of humor, silly, empathetic, madly in love with her friends and family, and a very gifted writer. It’s hard to isolate why, but I’ve never liked a teenager so much—at least not since I was a teenager. She was just really cool, in the best sense of the word. She never made me feel uncomfortable. She listened to me and responded thoughtfully, and was also happy to tell me I was full of shit. 
(On the day this picture was taken, I generally did a not-great job of being an Adult and cried a lot, and at one point Esther was talking about her complicated relationship with the idea of heaven, and I answered that there were all kinds of ways of imagining an infinite afterlife, some of which weren’t even necessarily that supernatural, and she just cocked me a look like, “You need to learn the meaning of the word infinite.” She was right, of course. Back in my hotel room that night, I jotted down easy comfort isn’t comforting, which ended up in TFiOS.) 
The nearly two years since her death have complicated my relationship with Esther because now of course there is not only time but a book between us: I could never have written The Fault in Our Stars without knowing Esther. Every word on that book depends upon her.
But at the same time, I don’t want people conflating Esther with Hazel (they’re very different), and it’s extremely important to me that I not claim to be telling Esther’s story. Esther’s story belongs to Esther and to her family, and they will tell it brilliantly and beautifully.
When I was doing publicity for the book, lots of reporters wanted me to talk about Esther because these days novels “based on a true story” do so much better than novels that are just novels. I never really knew how to deal with these questions, and I still don’t, because the truth (as always) is complicated: Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish. But the story is also inspired by many other people—by my son, by my wife, by the kids I knew and loved who died in the children’s hospital when I was a student chaplain, by my own parents (my dad is a cancer survivor), etc.
I wish she’d read TFiOS. I suspect she would’ve found it a bit far-fetched, but I do hope she’d have enjoyed it anyway. I’ll never know, though. I am astonished that the book has found such a broad audience, but the person I most want to read it never will.
Esther has become a hero in our community, and the heroic narrative doesn’t always line up perfectly with the person she was. (Heroic narratives never do.) But this much was true, at least as far as I knew her: She was generous, and loving, and full of grace—which was, after all, her middle name.
Plus, she knew how to make a funny face on cue.
When I told Esther we wanted to celebrate her birthday as long as there were vlogbrothers videos, and that videos on that day could be about whatever she wanted them to be about, she waited a couple weeks before getting back to me. She finally decided she wanted it to be a day that celebrated love in families and among friends. I think of Esther Day as a kind of Valentine’s Day for all the other kinds of love.
It was a brilliant idea, Esther. Thank you for Esther Day. Thank you for helping me say to my family and friends what I still hope I can say to you, even over the great divide: I love you.
(You can support This Star Won’t Go Out, the organization founded in Esther’s memory that helps families of children with cancer, directly here or by buying a TSWGO wristband.)

fishingboatproceeds:

Everybody was told to make a funny face, but I didn’t get the memo.

Esther Earl would’ve been 18 tomorrow, a real adult. I miss her. 

It’s very easy to turn the dead into Lessons for the Living—to say that Esther taught me to Live Life or To Be Grateful or Not To Take Beauty for Granted. But honestly, in my opinion at least, any lessons learned from her death could’ve been learned in some other, easier way. I think the universe overall would be better off if she were still making videos.

I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died. 

She was young, blessed with a genuinely sophomoric sense of humor, silly, empathetic, madly in love with her friends and family, and a very gifted writer. It’s hard to isolate why, but I’ve never liked a teenager so much—at least not since I was a teenager. She was just really cool, in the best sense of the word. She never made me feel uncomfortable. She listened to me and responded thoughtfully, and was also happy to tell me I was full of shit. 

(On the day this picture was taken, I generally did a not-great job of being an Adult and cried a lot, and at one point Esther was talking about her complicated relationship with the idea of heaven, and I answered that there were all kinds of ways of imagining an infinite afterlife, some of which weren’t even necessarily that supernatural, and she just cocked me a look like, “You need to learn the meaning of the word infinite.” She was right, of course. Back in my hotel room that night, I jotted down easy comfort isn’t comforting, which ended up in TFiOS.) 

The nearly two years since her death have complicated my relationship with Esther because now of course there is not only time but a book between us: I could never have written The Fault in Our Stars without knowing Esther. Every word on that book depends upon her.

But at the same time, I don’t want people conflating Esther with Hazel (they’re very different), and it’s extremely important to me that I not claim to be telling Esther’s story. Esther’s story belongs to Esther and to her family, and they will tell it brilliantly and beautifully.

When I was doing publicity for the book, lots of reporters wanted me to talk about Esther because these days novels “based on a true story” do so much better than novels that are just novels. I never really knew how to deal with these questions, and I still don’t, because the truth (as always) is complicated: Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish. But the story is also inspired by many other people—by my son, by my wife, by the kids I knew and loved who died in the children’s hospital when I was a student chaplain, by my own parents (my dad is a cancer survivor), etc.

I wish she’d read TFiOS. I suspect she would’ve found it a bit far-fetched, but I do hope she’d have enjoyed it anyway. I’ll never know, though. I am astonished that the book has found such a broad audience, but the person I most want to read it never will.

Esther has become a hero in our community, and the heroic narrative doesn’t always line up perfectly with the person she was. (Heroic narratives never do.) But this much was true, at least as far as I knew her: She was generous, and loving, and full of grace—which was, after all, her middle name.

Plus, she knew how to make a funny face on cue.

When I told Esther we wanted to celebrate her birthday as long as there were vlogbrothers videos, and that videos on that day could be about whatever she wanted them to be about, she waited a couple weeks before getting back to me. She finally decided she wanted it to be a day that celebrated love in families and among friends. I think of Esther Day as a kind of Valentine’s Day for all the other kinds of love.

It was a brilliant idea, Esther. Thank you for Esther Day. Thank you for helping me say to my family and friends what I still hope I can say to you, even over the great divide: I love you.

(You can support This Star Won’t Go Out, the organization founded in Esther’s memory that helps families of children with cancer, directly here or by buying a TSWGO wristband.)

23,805 notes   •   August 03 2012, 10:43 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

Happy Esther Day, All.

Look, I know I’ve been pretty absent from tumblr. Life got in the way and *insert more pathetic excuses that don’t really matter*. Anyways, I just wanted to take the time and tell you all I love you. Especially if you still recognize this tiger face in the midst of your much-more-interesting dashboard.

If you don’t know who Esther is, she’s a Nerdfighter and friend of John’s who passed away a couple of years ago. All she wanted was people to tell each other they loved them in a platonic way more often. So Nerdfighteria takes this day once a year to remind friends and family they love them. Especially if they are someone for whom this is typically hard for (like John and Hank Green).

So I love you all, and I hope to be back on Tumblr in full soon.

perpetualthoughts:

To make this stamp I used a design I’d drawn in Photoshop and printed it out at the appropriate size. Before the ink set I transferred it to the rubber by simply rubbing the back of the paper with my fingernail. Then I outlined in pencil and carved out around the shape. I usually carve out the outline and then cut out the rest of the areas I want blank.

Then I made a print for my wall!

I  also made a dftba themed one a while ago.

:D

Hoo! Ha! Nerdfighters!

241 notes   •   March 07 2012, 12:43 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
4,947 notes   •   February 29 2012, 11:46 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
edwardspoonhands:

kanderpants:

OH MY GOD. 


Yup….that’s how it happened. 

So now we must explain to the Outsiders that we don’t fight nerds, but rather for them.

edwardspoonhands:

kanderpants:

OH MY GOD. 


Yup….that’s how it happened. 

So now we must explain to the Outsiders that we don’t fight nerds, but rather for them.

1,798 notes   •   February 25 2012, 07:32 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
alliknowisimanerdfighter:

or 40,978,064,635 sec
or 682967743 min and 55 sec
or 11382795  hours 43 minutes and 55 sec
or 474283 days 3 hours 43 minutes and 55 sec
Okay that was so much work but totally worth it. I multiplied every single videos views by how long it was  and then added it up no rounding or averages here.
I’m going to go sleep now. with the multiple screen shoots of hank uncomfortably close to the camera etched in to by brain to haunt my dreams.

What about that extra second YouTube occasionally tacks on?

alliknowisimanerdfighter:

or 40,978,064,635 sec

or 682967743 min and 55 sec

or 11382795 hours 43 minutes and 55 sec

or 474283 days 3 hours 43 minutes and 55 sec

Okay that was so much work but totally worth it. I multiplied every single videos views by how long it was  and then added it up no rounding or averages here.

I’m going to go sleep now. with the multiple screen shoots of hank uncomfortably close to the camera etched in to by brain to haunt my dreams.

What about that extra second YouTube occasionally tacks on?

382 notes   •   February 23 2012, 02:57 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

The Nerdfighter Song

- Horrible Fiction

School of Nerdfighteria

I think we need a school of Nerdfighteria. Here are some ideas for teachers, please please, please, add to/change the teachers. WE NEED TO LEARN ALL THE SUBJECTS!!

-

p.s. In case if you didn’t know, this is all hypothetical. I’m not dragging John away from novel writing. Not ever! Plus, I wouldn’t make someone teach if they had no desire to do so.

-

Humanities (a.k.a. English and History and Stuff) - John Green

Science - Hank Green

Mathematics - ViHart

Music - Tom Milsom

Art - Vondell Swain

What if… #IForget

What if Harry Potter fans - I’m eyeing you hard, Nerdfighteria - wrote a script for all the Harry Potter books to turn into 7 movies. Not a line-for-line retelling of the books, or a remake of the movies, but scripts that fit a normal movie-length time and are good. Not just to fans, but to movie lovers as well, and people like my father who have never read the books. Comprehensible is what I’m saying. Because as movies, what we have is not up to scratch, people walk out of theaters scratching their heads because it doesn’t make sense, while at the same time HP nerds are moaning because the people in charge ship Harry/Hermione more than the actual plot (that’s right HPatHBP viewers, romance is a side plot in the books). Does this make sense? Is it not possible to make a good movie that is also true to the books?