Nicole
she/her/hers
This blog is a little of everything and a lot of inconsistency. I am Queen of the Queue and over-tag everything, so don't be afraid to ask me to tag something for you. I am planning a hobbit hole and you should talk to me about your dream house. Also Tamora Pierce. And The Posterchildren. As well as anything that's weighing you down (I am nearly guaranteed to be on your side).
Profile picture courtesy of Raya

 

lostgrrrls:

atchka:

linzthenerd:

theguilteaparty:

crippledcuriosity:

itsfondue:

Isn’t it nice how people twist their religious scripture to suit their weds but when it’s used against them it’s suddenly not okay

I talked to a monk about this quote once (we have mutual friends, and he came to a New Year’s Eve party at my shared art studio). He said this isn’t even talking about homosexuality. That the bible never actually says homosexuality is wrong. What that passage means is this:

Women were treated as subservient and it that you shouldn’t treat other men as subservient, like they are beneath you. It is not talking about homosexuality. If it was, it would say it outright since the bible lists other things outright.

I take the word of a monk who have studied the bible extensively more than a self proclaimed Christian.

The above text, I would like to point out is from the point of view of this translation of the original Hebrew. I spoke with my cousin’s rabbi on the matter and his response was different, saying that it was a mistranslation. See, the true translation says that a man shall not lie with another in the bed of a woman, which is to say, the Hebrews had a shit ton of rules about when a man was or was not allowed in a woman’s bed and private quarters (including, if she didn’t want you there, you weren’t allowed there. Hebrew women were also allowed to divorce their husbands and the image of the ‘oppressive Hebrew people’ is an image that was propogated by Christianity which, historically speaking, doesn’t treat the Jewish people too well and liked to paint them as being rather barbaric and backwards and cultish with their traditions, which, another piece of fun info, their traditions were one of the main reasons why the Jewish people were less likely, in medieval times, to die of the plague. Because washing your hands and avoiding the dead and vermin and the like was a lot of help. Of course the Christians persecuted them for not dying but that’s another matter. I’m sidetracked). So the verse is literally saying ‘Don’t fuck in some lady’s bed because that’s just goddamn rude’

Also, whenever a Christian brings the book of Leviticus up, you should feel free to point out that these are rules that were given to make the Hebrew people prepared for when the son of God came to earth. In Christianity, it’s believed the son of God was Jesus. So by following the rules set in Leviticus or pushing them as things we should follow, they’re saying that Jesus was not the son of God, and that Jesus did not, in fact, die for our sins. Jewish people believe, in their faith, that the son of God hasn’t yet been born, so many choose to follow these rules.

Most people of course roll their eyes when I explain the translation of the verse (full breakdown found here) but it’s always fun to point out the nature of the rules in Leviticus and the implications of following them. 

I’m a theology student and I am on the verge of crying because of how accurate this commentary is. Historical context is simultaneously the most interesting and most important part of interpreting any texts. 

No, no, no… Jesus Christ wrote the King James Version in his own blood. God hates gay people, you can’t argue with that. Unless, of course, you’re educated.

The number of interpretations I’ve heard of this one quote is getting ridiculous.

(Source: idiotsonfb)

siljes-grimoire:

sulphurblue:

loreleysfairlyangelic:

sulphurblue:

failmacaw:

THE NINE CHOIRS OF HEAVEN.  An info-graphic for my editorial class and god am I thankful it’s done.  Way too much went into this than what I had time for, but hey… I actually kind of like it?

Now excuse me, I must return to my fashion major lifestyle and go sew a coat u_u

EDIT:  Re-uploaded with easier viewing! 

Beautiful graphic. Gorgeous. 

An info-graphic to go along with my Angelic Hierarchies post?  Thank goodness!

There’s some disparity. I was always taught the order was supposed to go Seraphim, Cherubim, Ophanim, Dominions, Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels, angels. 

That was my only gripe. But I can forgive because this was so beautiful. 

Just jumping in here because this is one of my favorite things to research in my spare time. c:

From everything I’ve studied, there are at least ten different versions of the Hierarchy, at least in Medieval theology. And some of the groups in each sphere have various names (such as Thrones also being called Ophanim), and there are a few groups that only appear in certain manuscripts and never again (such as Aeons and Hosts in the 1st Century Apostolic Constitutions). A few manuscripts only list seven ranks, and others invert the order of angels completely.

That’s not even looking at the Jewish angelic hierarchy, which is completely different and comprised of ten (I think?) separate ranks of angels. Although I don’t know much on this other than a passing glance; I am not Jewish nor have I studied Judaism in depth.

I can’t speak on what is being taught in Christian groups now, as my family was never that religious. But just like all parts of religion, the Angelic Hierarchy contradicts itself depending on who you reference from, but it seems the above is the commonly accepted order.

I have also seen referenced two different classes of Archangels. One is capitalized and refers to Michael, Gabriel, etc, or those angels who have authority over all angels (which is a whole other matter: some sources refer to four Archangels, some refer to seven, the New Testament only refers to Michael and Gabriel, it all gets very confusing). And the second group is lowercase and simply refers to the 8th angelic rank.

I’ve also seen Satan referred to as belonging to different spheres. Ephesians 6:12 could be interpreted as Satan belonging to Powers, but Thomas Aquinas claims he was a Cherub. Lucifer is generally considered an Archangel (capitalized) or a Seraph, I think, but don’t quote me on that as it is also my UPG (whether or not you consider Satan and Lucifer the same is your own UPG and whole different story entirely, I don’t yet know where I stand on that matter).

But for all I know I could have everything backwards on this, I am not a scholarly source on angels. I just enjoy studying them.

bythegods:

forlackofabettercomic:

Consider yourselves judged.

This is relevant to your interests.The apocalypse is something that most scripture devotes at least a little time to. If you’re gonna write a beginning and a middle, might as well scribble together an ending, right?
The book of Revelations is a particularly heated peace of apocalyptic scripture for a few reasons.
First off, many of the predictions are so vague/historically abundant that it’s provided religious “evidence” of the end times’ approach to every generation between John the Apostle (the purported scribe of the book who few now believe to have been the true author) and today. Wars, disease, and celestial twinkles aren’t exactly something the human race has ever had to do without for more than a year or two. 
Also, it’s worth noting that the Book of Revelations—all of it—was written specifically as a piece of anti-Roman propaganda. The oft-referenced beast with seven heads, for example, is a thinly veiled reference for the famed seven hills on which Rome was built. Also, any time the New Testament refers to Babylon, they’re talking about Rome. Mean ol’ Rome. 
So, specifically, the powers of the Christian heavens are meant to come down, bringing swift justice upon the oppressive (to Christians) Empire. As some of you may know, that didn’t quite happen. And now we’re left with a book that the church could’ve quietly retired from the canon, but instead just repurposed for whichever political opponent of the day was up in their grill.
A whole lot of people are eagerly awaiting good ol’ Jesus riding in on his white horse (literally) while simultaneously appearing as a (literal) lamb, fighting a dragon, a seven-headed beast, and a magic lady riding said beast, and then fighting a long, painful war on the scorched remains of the earth. Suggestions of “are you perhaps familiar with the art of metaphor?” seem to fall on deaf ears.

bythegods:

forlackofabettercomic:

Consider yourselves judged.

This is relevant to your interests.

The apocalypse is something that most scripture devotes at least a little time to. If you’re gonna write a beginning and a middle, might as well scribble together an ending, right?

The book of Revelations is a particularly heated peace of apocalyptic scripture for a few reasons.

First off, many of the predictions are so vague/historically abundant that it’s provided religious “evidence” of the end times’ approach to every generation between John the Apostle (the purported scribe of the book who few now believe to have been the true author) and today. Wars, disease, and celestial twinkles aren’t exactly something the human race has ever had to do without for more than a year or two. 

Also, it’s worth noting that the Book of Revelations—all of it—was written specifically as a piece of anti-Roman propaganda. The oft-referenced beast with seven heads, for example, is a thinly veiled reference for the famed seven hills on which Rome was built. Also, any time the New Testament refers to Babylon, they’re talking about Rome. Mean ol’ Rome. 

So, specifically, the powers of the Christian heavens are meant to come down, bringing swift justice upon the oppressive (to Christians) Empire. As some of you may know, that didn’t quite happen. And now we’re left with a book that the church could’ve quietly retired from the canon, but instead just repurposed for whichever political opponent of the day was up in their grill.

A whole lot of people are eagerly awaiting good ol’ Jesus riding in on his white horse (literally) while simultaneously appearing as a (literal) lamb, fighting a dragon, a seven-headed beast, and a magic lady riding said beast, and then fighting a long, painful war on the scorched remains of the earth. Suggestions of “are you perhaps familiar with the art of metaphor?” seem to fall on deaf ears.

spoopyshivers:

spoopyshivers:

why do old people read the bible so much

i asked the old guy standing in front of me at the post office and he said “it’s because we’re cramming for finals”

(Source: silentshivers)

Peanut Butter (or Lead) And Pineapples: inautumn-inkashmir: Things that have caused strife, death, and discord...

inautumn-inkashmir:

Things that have caused strife, death, and discord in the world throughout time

  • Religion

Things that have also caused strife, death, and discord in the world throughout time

  • 'humanitarian interventionism'
  • the rise of the nation-state
  • economic collapse
  • imperialism

My parents died years ago. I was very close to them. I still miss them terribly. I know I always will. I long to believe that their essence, their personalities, what I loved so much about them, are - really and truly - still in existence somewhere. […] Plainly, there’s something within me that’s ready to believe in life after death. And it’s not the least bit interested in whether there’s any sober evidence for it. So I don’t guffaw at the woman who visits her husband’s grave and chats him up every now and then, maybe on the anniversary of his death. It’s not hard to understand. And if I have difficulties with the ontological status of who she’s talking to, that’s all right. That’s not what this is about. This is about humans being human.

Carl Sagan on why sometimes it’s good to temporarily forgo your beliefs in order to respect someone else’s (via applepiesfromscratch)

Alternatively, Carl Sagan on (one of the reasons) why Richard Dawkins/many self-proclaimed atheists are assholes. (via imathers)

(Source: carlsagan)

themasterslover:

sonneillonv:

palomayombe:

sentientcitizen:

penciltothetemple:

jestermd:

the-last-of-december:

Nice guy Lucifer is the best meme

Yes

Oh man, get on my blog.

By far my favorite one here is “Not a character in the Bible / Still most interesting character in the Bible”. TRUTH.

These are always amusing.

Favorite meme

i’m sorry but can we talk about the picture a little.i mean the artist was like “oh let’s paint lucifer.and make him classy”

(Source: i-am-beard)

adambloghart:

My professor today argued that God (I think he meant Jesus) must be female because Mary had a virgin birth and without a Y chromosome he couldn’t have come out male.

“Loving the sinner but hating the sin,” is not even a micro-step forward. It’s deluding yourself into thinking you’re taking a step forward and being so Liberal, but in actuality, you’re rooted to your homophobia, staying in place.

It also comes off as highly condescending, with a dash of, “I’ll pray for you,”

Take your prayers

and shove them where the sun don’t shine.

Taking it one step further, I know there are Muslims who think being lgbt* is a “test” from Allah. And, in some ways, it is. It’s a test in the way that people treat us differently because of it. Not a test as in, “Well, God made gay people, but it’s a test and if you pass (pass, here, means, don’t touch another soul as long as you live and in some extreme cases, don’t think about touching another soul as long as you live), you’ll be rewarded in Jannah (heaven)!”

That is also not progressive.

Also not helpful.

Stop it.

The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbor to say there are twenty gods, or no God. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg.

Thomas Jefferson (via policygal)

Consider the irony of the Obama administration arguing here that the Guantánamo Bay detainees are not ‘persons’ within the scope of US law guaranteeing religious freedom, in a post-Citizens United world where even corporations are endowed with legal personhood.

US to force-feed Guantanamo detainees during Ramadan

Happy 4th of July, everyone. American freedom, peace, progress, etc.

(via thesassylund)

(Source: mehreenkasana)

edwad:

muslims make up about 1/4 of the worlds population. you’re bound to have some criminals and very bad people that practice islam, but nobody cared about the religion of the sandy hook shooter or of other people who have done horrible things. the only time it matters is when they’re Muslim and that really pisses me off.

Consider how textbooks treat Native religions as a unitary whole. The American Way describes Native American religion in these words: “These Native Americans [in the Southeast] believed that nature was filled with spirits. Each form of life, such as plants and animals, had a spirit. Earth and air held spirits too. People were never alone. They shared their lives with the spirits of nature.” Way is trying to show respect for Native American religion, but it doesn’t work. Stated flatly like this, the beliefs seem like make-believe, not the sophisticated theology of a higher civilization. Let us try a similarly succinct summary of the beliefs of many Christians today: “These Americans believed that one great male god ruled the world. Sometimes they divided him into three parts, which they called father, son, and holy ghost. They ate crackers and wine or grape juice, believing that they were eating the son’s body and drinking his blood. If they believed strongly enough, they would live on forever after they died.” Textbooks never describe Christianity this way. It’s offensive. Believers would immediately argue that such a depiction fails to convey the symbolic meaning or the spiritual satisfaction of communion.

Lies My Teacher Told Me, James Loewen (via whoistorule)

Islam starter kit for English speakers

pearlsfromthepath:

Because accessing reliable resources has become highly inconvenient, we tend to trivialise the importance we give to what we read, whether it be on the Internet or in books. For this reason, I have composed a list of crucial texts, that essentially addresses Muslims who live in the West. Although numerous PDF links are provided, I strongly recommend you purchase these books if you decide to use them in sha Allah.
  • Translations of the Quran

- The Quran, by M. A. Abdel Haleem [PDF]
- The Message of the Quran, by Muhammad Asad [PDF]

  • Collections of Hadith

- Al-Muwatta, collected by Imām Mālik [PDF
Sahīh al-Bukhārī, collected by Imām Bukhārī [PDF]
Sahīh Muslim, collected by Muslim Ibn al-Hajjāj [PDF]
Sunan Abu Dawud, collected by Abu Dawud [PDF]
Jāmi’ al-Tirmidhī, collected by Muhammad al-Tirmidhī [PDF
Sunan Ibn Mājah, collected by Ibn Mājah [PDF]
Hadith Qudsi, based on an-Nawawī’s work [PDF]

  • Exegesis of the Quran

The Message of the Quran, by Muhammad Asad [PDF
Tafsir ibn al-Kathir, by Ismaīl ibn al-Kathīr [PDF]
Tanwir al-Miqbas, by Ibn Abbas
Tafsir al-Qurtubī, by Imām al-Qurtubī  

  • Transliterations

The Quran: Transliteration in Roman Script, by Yusuf Ali Abdullah
The Quran: Transliteration in Roman Script, by M. Pickthall 

  • Quranic sciences
Dictionary of Quranic Usage, by M. A. Abdel Haleem
Understanding the Quran: themes and style, by M. A. Abdel Haleem
- Al-Itqan fi Ulum al-Quran, by Imām As-Suyutī [PDF]
  • Islamic jurisprudence 

- Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence, by Muhammad Hashim Kamali [PDF]
- The Clarified in Legal Theory, by Imām al-Ghazālī 
The Lawful and Prohibited in Islam, by Yusuf al-Qaradawi [PDF]
- The Four Imams, by Mohamed Abu Zahra

  • History of Islam

Islam: The Straight Path, by John Esposito
The Emergence of Islam, by Muhammad Hamidullah
- In the Footsteps of the Prophet, by Tariq Ramadan 
- Western Muslims and the Future of Islam, by Tariq Ramadan [PDF]
- Stories of the Prophets, by Ismaīl ibn al-Kathīr [PDF]

  • Philosophy

The Reconstruction of Islamic Thought, by Muhammad Iqbal [PDF]
Revival of Religious Sciences, by Imām al-Ghazālī [Vol. 1,2,3,4]
Sufism for Non-Sufis? Ibn Ata’ Allah’s Tâj al-‘Arûs, by Sherman Jackson
Disciplining the Soul and Breaking the Two Desires, by Imām al-Ghazālī