sandchigger:

cheskamouse:

xekstrin:

Ok but: Muslims in space. How do they pray? You know? This really bothers me. This should be addressed in more science fiction.

Toward earth?

Malaysia (a Muslim country) actually came up with answers to these questions after they had a few astronauts launched into orbit.

Link

9,786 notes   •   May 25 2014, 01:53 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#space   #religion   #Islam   #astronaut   

Peanut Butter (or Lead) And Pineapples: musaafer: For the third time in less than a week, I’ve been exposed to... 

musaafer:

For the third time in less than a week, I’ve been exposed to Islamophobic, racist and hostile public remarks and had to respond in a public speaking setting.

I gave a guest lecture on Hijab in an anthropology class. Students asked many important and good questions. One asked about my specific experience in Southern California. When I answered his question, another student raised her hand and snapped at me, saying that I’m talking about the American experience, not the experience in “other countries like Afghanistan” where women are “shot in the head and can’t get an education”, saying that I can talk about the choice to wear hijab in the US because we have freedom here but that I’m leaving out other places because women are oppressed there.

She truly, truly tried to interrogate and fry me with her questions like, “What about forced marriages in Afghanistan? I read about education in Afghanistan so I know that girls can’t leave the house. Where does that fit in? What is the diaspora doing to fix the culture back home??” But she messed with the wrong person. 

I answered a few questions calmly. “We can’t make generalizations about other places because their cultures are different than ours. The violence you mention is political, not religious in nature.”

She kept going at it. When she asked me what the diaspora is doing to fix it, I had had it with her. “So you’re asking me what we are doing to create the mess you created, right? Let me tell you what we are doing, Afghan women in the diaspora and in Afghanistan are organizing, fundraising, planning and working hard to empower women and to ensure a more stable and productive future for all. And if your concern was genuine enough for you to shift your focus away from tryna find faults in Islam and towards seeing what is actually done in the country, you would see that. But you’re so busy trying to find faults and then attributing them to Islam as opposed to anything else, that you don’t even care to see what is actually being done. And if we’re gonna talk about education, let’s also talk about war and how during war, it’s difficult for girls or boys to attain an education. So instead of attributing every wrong to Islam, in a country like Afghanistan that has been at war for over 30 years, try thinking about how the continued occupation, and wars that we have either financed, are complicit in or are continuously fighting have disenfranchised the Afghan population and made this education you’re so concerned about difficult to obtain. Would you, by the same logic, blame Christianity or secularism for the continued misogyny that by the way is incredibly prevalent, the glass ceiling, the violence, the racism, and the hate?” 

When she still wouldn’t shut up despite the applause from the rest of the class, the professor asked me to talk about my thesis. I told them that it is about the ways in which conservatives who otherwise don’t give two shits about women in a domestic context use the same feminist rhetoric they otherwise so violently reject to justify wars; “Well, those women over there need saving, and we have to go and liberate them.. but who cares about women here”. It shut her up. 

Turns out, she was a veteran who was trying to tell me about my country. Not one bit surprised.

215 notes   •   October 25 2013, 05:25 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#islamophobia   #islam   #college   
thesassylund:

shiamuslim:

drunken-rambling:

flosephstalin:

madwriterscorner:

Muslim women can say they are not oppressed wearing the hijab or burqa as much as they want….
NOBODY BUYS IT
If you disagree please RATIONALLY explain to me how wearing a hijab or burqa does not oppress you, how Islam does not oppress women because I really do not believe a word of it. 

Okay darling, take a seat. We’ll be discussing two things right now.
You say you have the right to think going out topless is PERFECTLY fine without you wanting to be objectified,yet when someone states they’re perfectly fine being covered up, they’re somehow oppressed because they aren’t thinking LIKE YOU. You’re literally oppressing me with your ignorance towards the subject here, stop with your hypocrisy.
Another pointer is that a Muslim woman has the FREEDOM of doing what she thinks is best for her. Every single creature on God’s earth has that freedom to think, observe, and choose what is best for them ALONE. Islam simply encourages the covering up of women because it will force people to take her at face value and not as another person. It’s an encouragement that states “I believe in this and I am DAMN proud to be believing in this”. If you have any freaking doubt that she doesn’t believe in what she’s wearing because ~oppression~ you need to reevaluate how you know that she doesn’t believe in it. And don’t give me that “we’ve been brainwashed” crap because you are literally degrading other women for your cause.
And when you degrade other women by stating that they’re not in their right mind for thinking differently than you, you are not helping your cause or yourself or anybody at all.
But hey you’re so scared of a fucking piece of cloth wrapped around my head so why was I even thinking you’d realise that you’re butchering what feminism used to be.

Actually, in any country where Islam has a say in the government, a Muslim woman does not have the “freedom” to wear one. She has to wear one or face extremely violent consequences, up to and including death. THAT’S what they are protesting. Even in non-Muslim countries there have been numerous cases of abuse and assault (often by their own husbands) as punishment for not covering up.
But whatever, that’s their beliefs and they choose that, right? Go ahead and Google “what is the penalty for apostasy in Islam?”, to see what happens if they change their mind.

R u ok?
Women aren’t forced to wear hijab in Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Sudan, Dubai, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Azerbaijan, Turkey, and a slew of other Muslim majority countries on the planet.
You’re literally taking a handful of examples and extrapolating a conclusion from that. Do u kno what that is? It’s called stereotyping and bigotry, and it’s really a thin line away from racism because you think you need to protect minority women from Islam. If you look in any book, from Shi’ism to Sunnism to Sufism to Ahmadi thought, you’re not going to find any sanctioning for violence against women that has not been thoroughly challenged and shut down.
What is culture, a small, corrupted, minute instances of violence against women, cannot be considered having its basis in fiqh from any of the madhabs or in the books of ahadith or in the Qur’an or on the divine rights of men and women upon each other.
U can try again and apologise for your bigotry tho.

A) why is it backwards
B) apostasy in islam lmaaaooo why does everyone assume so much stuff about apostates around the world why do atheists who have not even been influenced by islam believe they know so much about apostates, just because you googled some shit about ex muslims doesn’t make you well informed about it. y’all only care about apostates when they fit the ‘poor, oppressed atheists’ stereotype. 
C) turkey is a country that banned hijabs for women but that means that its good for women right? turkish women protested and violently fought back against women who wanted to wear the hijab but because of secularism, they limited a woman’s choice to wear what she wants
D) LOL SINCE WHEN ARE ~ALL~ MUSLIM WOMEN FORCED TO WEAR THE HIJAB DO YOU UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENT CULTURES SURROUNDING ISLAM LOLOLOL ISLAM IS IN A HUNDRED COUNTRIES AND IT IS A DIFFERENT IMPLEMENTATION EVERY SINGLE TIME A LOT OF FAMILIES DO NOT ALLOW WOMEN TO WEAR THE HIJAB EVEN IF THEY WANT TO
E) since when do all muslim countries w/ their mixture of secular and sharia law have punishments for women who don’t wear hijab? again, turkey is a country that punishes women for wearing the hijab, this isn’t even a law in many countries your facts are wrong
F) ok let’s see how many non muslim women in america have been abused because they aren’t wearing the clothes that their families/husbands think is appropriate. marilyn monroe in her famous photo shoot where her dress was being blown up, remember that photo shoot? yeah she got beat up severely by her husband because he was infuriated w/ her wearing something like that in public. this isn’t a muslim problem this is a problem in the entire world
G) ‘explain to me rationally’ lmao so entitled. you get all the facts wrong and then you demand to be told nicely what you got wrong? you speak over muslim women and apostates and stated false information about laws in muslim countries and you want to be told you’re wrong but in a nice, gentle way so your little feelings don’t get hurt? nice try.

thesassylund:

shiamuslim:

drunken-rambling:

flosephstalin:

madwriterscorner:

Muslim women can say they are not oppressed wearing the hijab or burqa as much as they want….

NOBODY BUYS IT

If you disagree please RATIONALLY explain to me how wearing a hijab or burqa does not oppress you, how Islam does not oppress women because I really do not believe a word of it. 

Okay darling, take a seat. We’ll be discussing two things right now.

You say you have the right to think going out topless is PERFECTLY fine without you wanting to be objectified,yet when someone states they’re perfectly fine being covered up, they’re somehow oppressed because they aren’t thinking LIKE YOU. You’re literally oppressing me with your ignorance towards the subject here, stop with your hypocrisy.

Another pointer is that a Muslim woman has the FREEDOM of doing what she thinks is best for her. Every single creature on God’s earth has that freedom to think, observe, and choose what is best for them ALONE. Islam simply encourages the covering up of women because it will force people to take her at face value and not as another person. It’s an encouragement that states “I believe in this and I am DAMN proud to be believing in this”. If you have any freaking doubt that she doesn’t believe in what she’s wearing because ~oppression~ you need to reevaluate how you know that she doesn’t believe in it. And don’t give me that “we’ve been brainwashed” crap because you are literally degrading other women for your cause.

And when you degrade other women by stating that they’re not in their right mind for thinking differently than you, you are not helping your cause or yourself or anybody at all.

But hey you’re so scared of a fucking piece of cloth wrapped around my head so why was I even thinking you’d realise that you’re butchering what feminism used to be.

Actually, in any country where Islam has a say in the government, a Muslim woman does not have the “freedom” to wear one. She has to wear one or face extremely violent consequences, up to and including death. THAT’S what they are protesting. Even in non-Muslim countries there have been numerous cases of abuse and assault (often by their own husbands) as punishment for not covering up.

But whatever, that’s their beliefs and they choose that, right? Go ahead and Google “what is the penalty for apostasy in Islam?”, to see what happens if they change their mind.

R u ok?

Women aren’t forced to wear hijab in Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Sudan, Dubai, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Azerbaijan, Turkey, and a slew of other Muslim majority countries on the planet.

You’re literally taking a handful of examples and extrapolating a conclusion from that. Do u kno what that is? It’s called stereotyping and bigotry, and it’s really a thin line away from racism because you think you need to protect minority women from Islam. If you look in any book, from Shi’ism to Sunnism to Sufism to Ahmadi thought, you’re not going to find any sanctioning for violence against women that has not been thoroughly challenged and shut down.

What is culture, a small, corrupted, minute instances of violence against women, cannot be considered having its basis in fiqh from any of the madhabs or in the books of ahadith or in the Qur’an or on the divine rights of men and women upon each other.

U can try again and apologise for your bigotry tho.

A) why is it backwards

B) apostasy in islam lmaaaooo why does everyone assume so much stuff about apostates around the world why do atheists who have not even been influenced by islam believe they know so much about apostates, just because you googled some shit about ex muslims doesn’t make you well informed about it. y’all only care about apostates when they fit the ‘poor, oppressed atheists’ stereotype. 

C) turkey is a country that banned hijabs for women but that means that its good for women right? turkish women protested and violently fought back against women who wanted to wear the hijab but because of secularism, they limited a woman’s choice to wear what she wants

D) LOL SINCE WHEN ARE ~ALL~ MUSLIM WOMEN FORCED TO WEAR THE HIJAB DO YOU UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENT CULTURES SURROUNDING ISLAM LOLOLOL ISLAM IS IN A HUNDRED COUNTRIES AND IT IS A DIFFERENT IMPLEMENTATION EVERY SINGLE TIME A LOT OF FAMILIES DO NOT ALLOW WOMEN TO WEAR THE HIJAB EVEN IF THEY WANT TO

E) since when do all muslim countries w/ their mixture of secular and sharia law have punishments for women who don’t wear hijab? again, turkey is a country that punishes women for wearing the hijab, this isn’t even a law in many countries your facts are wrong

F) ok let’s see how many non muslim women in america have been abused because they aren’t wearing the clothes that their families/husbands think is appropriate. marilyn monroe in her famous photo shoot where her dress was being blown up, remember that photo shoot? yeah she got beat up severely by her husband because he was infuriated w/ her wearing something like that in public. this isn’t a muslim problem this is a problem in the entire world

G) ‘explain to me rationally’ lmao so entitled. you get all the facts wrong and then you demand to be told nicely what you got wrong? you speak over muslim women and apostates and stated false information about laws in muslim countries and you want to be told you’re wrong but in a nice, gentle way so your little feelings don’t get hurt? nice try.

460 notes   •   September 27 2013, 05:53 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

[Islam] will no longer be tolerated. Islam must change or we will facilitate its self-destruction. [That opens the possibility of applying] “the historical precedents of Dresden, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagasaki” to Islam’s holiest cities, and bringing about “Mecca and Medina[’s] destruction.

 -

Army Lt. Col. Matthew A. Dooley - U.S. Military Taught Officers: Use ‘Hiroshima’ Tactics for ‘Total War’ on Islam.

The commanders, lieutenant colonels, captains and colonels who sat in Dooley’s classroom, listening to the inflammatory material week after week, have now moved into higher-level assignments throughout the U.S. military.

Please read that again:

The historical precedents of Dresden, Tokyo, Hiroshima, Nagasaki” to Islam’s holiest cities, and bringing about “Mecca and Medina[’s] destruction.”

He also said:

Saudi Arabia [should be] threatened with starvation. Mecca and Madina destroyed. Islam reduced to cult status.

This is Lt. Col. Matthew A. Dooley’s Joint Staff Forces College presentation on “A Counter-Jihad Op Design Model” (.pdf) that calls for violent measures in a war against Islam. If this is the mentality of an individual providing lectures to the army, imagine the impact he has on those listening to him and following his orders. I don’t know what to say anymore.

(via mehreenkasana)

I would like to see them try.

(via kuroenigma)

Just in case you needed to be reminded that much of the US’s and the rest of the West’s foreign policy in the Middle East, Central Asia and North Africa is rooted in Islamophobic-xenophobia and military-imperialism. (via the-uncensored-she)

but whatever support the troops right? the army is great right nothing racist about American amirite?

(via theuppitynegras)

…are they seriously going to try and destroy an entire religion? 

i…am so horrified right now.

(via thesassylund)

1,836 notes   •   August 31 2013, 12:43 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#What.   #Islam   #america   #islamophobia   #military   

Islam starter kit for English speakers

pearlsfromthepath:

Because accessing reliable resources has become highly inconvenient, we tend to trivialise the importance we give to what we read, whether it be on the Internet or in books. For this reason, I have composed a list of crucial texts, that essentially addresses Muslims who live in the West. Although numerous PDF links are provided, I strongly recommend you purchase these books if you decide to use them in sha Allah.
  • Translations of the Quran

- The Quran, by M. A. Abdel Haleem [PDF]
- The Message of the Quran, by Muhammad Asad [PDF]

  • Collections of Hadith

- Al-Muwatta, collected by Imām Mālik [PDF
Sahīh al-Bukhārī, collected by Imām Bukhārī [PDF]
Sahīh Muslim, collected by Muslim Ibn al-Hajjāj [PDF]
Sunan Abu Dawud, collected by Abu Dawud [PDF]
Jāmi’ al-Tirmidhī, collected by Muhammad al-Tirmidhī [PDF
Sunan Ibn Mājah, collected by Ibn Mājah [PDF]
Hadith Qudsi, based on an-Nawawī’s work [PDF]

  • Exegesis of the Quran

The Message of the Quran, by Muhammad Asad [PDF
Tafsir ibn al-Kathir, by Ismaīl ibn al-Kathīr [PDF]
Tanwir al-Miqbas, by Ibn Abbas
Tafsir al-Qurtubī, by Imām al-Qurtubī  

  • Transliterations

The Quran: Transliteration in Roman Script, by Yusuf Ali Abdullah
The Quran: Transliteration in Roman Script, by M. Pickthall 

  • Quranic sciences
Dictionary of Quranic Usage, by M. A. Abdel Haleem
Understanding the Quran: themes and style, by M. A. Abdel Haleem
- Al-Itqan fi Ulum al-Quran, by Imām As-Suyutī [PDF]
  • Islamic jurisprudence 

- Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence, by Muhammad Hashim Kamali [PDF]
- The Clarified in Legal Theory, by Imām al-Ghazālī 
The Lawful and Prohibited in Islam, by Yusuf al-Qaradawi [PDF]
- The Four Imams, by Mohamed Abu Zahra

  • History of Islam

Islam: The Straight Path, by John Esposito
The Emergence of Islam, by Muhammad Hamidullah
- In the Footsteps of the Prophet, by Tariq Ramadan 
- Western Muslims and the Future of Islam, by Tariq Ramadan [PDF]
- Stories of the Prophets, by Ismaīl ibn al-Kathīr [PDF]

  • Philosophy

The Reconstruction of Islamic Thought, by Muhammad Iqbal [PDF]
Revival of Religious Sciences, by Imām al-Ghazālī [Vol. 1,2,3,4]
Sufism for Non-Sufis? Ibn Ata’ Allah’s Tâj al-‘Arûs, by Sherman Jackson
Disciplining the Soul and Breaking the Two Desires, by Imām al-Ghazālī

1,300 notes   •   April 09 2013, 08:56 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#reference   #Islam   #religion   

grrrl-riot:

androphilia:

Muslim Women Against FEMEN

The problem is that ever since 9/11 the western discourse on Islam and coverings has been shaped and dominated by what the Taliban was doing in Afghanistan. People think all Muslim women have been forced into wearing coverings when in fact many women choose to do it. If you want to wear a hijab or a niqab, that’s up to you. No woman in my immediate family has ever worn one and I have extended relatives whose children have chosen to wear it even though the mother doesn’t. Just because you don’t agree with something or understand something about another faith doesn’t mean it’s a horrible oppressive tool. As long as you aren’t hurting others, what’s the big fucking deal?

71,213 notes   •   April 05 2013, 01:02 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#hijab   #islam   #muslims   #islamophobia   

angryasiangirlsunited:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Women around the world respond to FEMEN’s ‘International Topless Jihad Day.’

#MuslimahPride

Via Muslim Women Against FEMEN: “This group is primarily for Muslim women who want to expose FEMEN for the Islamophobes/Imperialists that they are. We have had enough of western feminists imposing their values on us. We are taking a stand to make our voices heard and reclaim our agency. Muslim women have had enough of this paternalistic and parasitic relationship with SOME western feminists. The group is open to all, Muslim and non-Muslim, men and women.”

FUCK FEMEN!

7,867 notes   •   April 05 2013, 02:25 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#feminism   #women   #Muslims   #Islam   #politics   
panasonicyouth:

stfufauxminists:

kidomega:

ssxvxtricky:

adornoble:

ludwigfeurbased:

maggotmaster:

Die.

Burn him at the stake

haha I hope anyone who takes Richard Dawkins remotely seriously unfollows me now because he is literally scum

people think this clown is someone to be admired and emulated

This is an absolute joke. You can’t even begin to sensibly list all the ways Muslims have excelled in these areas.
Al-Khawarizmi invented algebra. The word algorithm is derived from his name.
Muslims invented the symbol to express an unknown quantity (x).
An arab muslim wrote the first medical book on smallpox in the whole of recorded history. No one else had ever done any research on this topic.


fuck richard dawkins

panasonicyouth:

stfufauxminists:

kidomega:

ssxvxtricky:

adornoble:

ludwigfeurbased:

maggotmaster:

Die.

Burn him at the stake

haha I hope anyone who takes Richard Dawkins remotely seriously unfollows me now because he is literally scum

people think this clown is someone to be admired and emulated

This is an absolute joke. You can’t even begin to sensibly list all the ways Muslims have excelled in these areas.

Al-Khawarizmi invented algebra. The word algorithm is derived from his name.

Muslims invented the symbol to express an unknown quantity (x).

An arab muslim wrote the first medical book on smallpox in the whole of recorded history. No one else had ever done any research on this topic.

fuck richard dawkins

2,733 notes   •   March 30 2013, 02:21 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

All aboard the collection bus

pbnpineapples:

aka14kgold:

this-is-not-jewish:

Today, one of my Jewish friends emailed me this chain letter:

I am truly perplexed that so many people are against a mosque being built at Ground Zero. I think it should be the goal of every American to be tolerant.

Thus, the Mosque should be allowed, in an effort to promote tolerance. That is why I also propose that two nightclubs be opened next door to the mosque, thereby promoting tolerance from within the mosque. We could call one of the clubs, “The Turban Cowboy”, which would be gay, and the other a topless bar called, “You Mecca Me Hot.”  Next door
should be a butcher shop that specializes in pork, and adjacent to that an open-pit barbecue pork restaurant, called “Iraq o’ Ribs.” Across the street there could be a lingerie store called “Victoria Keeps Nothing Secret,” with sexy mannequins with short burkas in the window modeling the goods.  Next door to the lingerie shop, a liquor
store called “Morehammered.”  All of this would encourage the Muslims to demonstrate the tolerance they demand of us, so the mosque problem would be solved.

If you agree with promoting tolerance, and you think this is a good plan, please pass it on, for the sake of tolerance.

This friend knows that I support Palestinian statehood. She knows I have read the entire Quran. She knows I run this blog. And yet she sent me this email anyway, in the apparent cynical confidence that despite my public views, as a Jew, I must secretly hate Muslims.

So I picked my jaw up off the floor, hit “reply all,” and typed this response:

Dear fellow recipients of this chain letter,

There’s a Jewish folktale that compares hateful words to feathers in a pillow—once you scatter them to the winds, there is no bringing them back. Given that the Islamic community center (which is neither a mosque, nor at Ground Zero) this chain letter alludes to opened in 2011, this chain letter has undoubtedly been making the rounds for years, and there is no possible way for me to find and address everyone who received it. I know that. But I can’t let this pass in silence, either, because silence implies agreement. Silence condones.

I don’t.

Read More

Kudos to you. This is awesome. I am so humbled and honored by everything you wrote. 

291 notes   •   March 29 2013, 04:42 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE

tomhiddlestonswife:

Apparently Laci Green quoted the Qur’an in her new video about period positivity. She uses the verse:

And they ask you about menstruation. Say: It is harm; therefore keep aloof from the women during the menstrual discharge and do not go near them until they have become clean; then when they have cleansed themselves, go in to them as Allah has commanded you; surely Allah loves those who turn much (to Him), and He loves those who purify themselves. 

2:222, Surat Al-Baqarah

Islam’s perspective is that menstruation is normal and it is natural, it is not considered as a “punishment” on women. There is nothing in Islam that says menstruating women are ‘dirty.’ Rather, menstruation is viewed as a natural process that normal, healthy women experience throughout their lifetime. Verse 2:222 of Surat Al-Baqarah is not implying women can’t “pray” when they’re menstruating; they can still ask things of God, make du’a, and read Qur’an. The MOTIONS of SALAH, which is entirely different, are not permitted, because in order to pray SALAH, you need wudhu, and blood invalidates wudhu. So bleeding from anywhere continuously invalidates it, even from a wound or a cut.

The part where it says “it is a harm” refers to how painful it can be, so avoid having sex with them because of that. Period cramps are absolutely horrible, I can’t imagine having to pray while experiencing it. Many women suffer from extreme cramps, heavy bleeding, nausea, headaches, and  other maladies during their cycle.  It is truly a sign of the Mercy of Allah (SWT) that we are excused from prayer during this time.The “pure” part of it refers to the ritual purification ghusl bath that must be taken after a woman has finished her monthly cycle. Muslims are expected to be in a state of cleanliness especially when going to pray.

If I missed anything or said anything wrong, kindly correct me or feel free to add.

618 notes   •   January 13 2013, 08:00 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#words   #Islam   #Qur'an   #menustration   #Religion   
spittingonhegel:

ismael-sarepta:

spittingonhegel:

Now you guys can stfu about “the west”

It’s the bias of the written — bias of what’s been preserved — that has perverted our understanding of the history of philosophy. However, the Middle-Eastern tradition (not all of who were Arabs or even Muslim) once revered the ancient Greeks as much as the West does. This fact has accounted for why, say, Greek manuscripts have survived (and the oldest extant that survive are only from the 9th-13th centuries A.D.), and why manuscripts of pre-Islamic Persia, or pre-monotheistic Mesopotamia that dealt with the same subjects have not.
Not to mention how much the ancient Greeks had as their basis the wisdom traditions, technology, engineering, astronomy, medicine, spirituality, and philosophy of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Phoenicians/Carthaginians, and the Scythians! — Oh but how the Western scholars warp their own research with these self-confirming biases, and pigeon-holes these “wisdom traditions” as unphilosophical because they are apparently too theological or spiritual? Or maybe because they’re too goddamn lazy to actually study what they’re talking about.
And yet, the Greek tradition itself is ubiquitous with, what? — Socrates, prophet of the Sun-God, anyone? Pythagoreans and their mathematical-mysticism Cult? Plato’s entire philosophy? Plotinus!? This Enlightenment rhetoric and its sycophants need to stop projecting their vision of some hyper-rational, atheistic, post-French Revolution, Western-European Academic understanding of street philosophy back to ancient Greece, and see it for what it obviously was — freethinking discourses that covered everything under the sun in unprecedented levels of diversity.
And, before you jump on the bandwagon of, “oh, Islamic philosophy was so this and that before the West”, don’t. All you’ll be doing is reinforcing a new pigeon-holing of what so-called “Islamic philosophy” was supposed to be — restricted and defined by a religion’s particular tradition. “Islamic” philosophy was hardly anything Islamic — Ibn al-Rawandi’s borderline atheism; al-Razi’s criticism of the prophetic tradition; al-Ma’arri’s harsh ridicule of divinely revealed truth. Not to mention the influence of the teachers of al-Farabi, ibn Sina, al-Khwarazmi and ibn al-Hazm, who were Christians, Buddhists, Jews, atheists, pagans, Zoroastrians, etc,etc. Call “Islamic philosophy” what it really was — philosophy that was done in the Medieval Middle-Eastern / Eastern Mediterranean.
It’s time to throw out these pigeon-holes like “Islamic”, “Western”, and “Middle-Eastern” philosophy — and look at the big picture of a great intellectual tradition that has been kindled within conditions unique to Afroeurasian Civilization — in particular, the Eastern Mediterranean to the Oxus-Jaxartes.These designations of “religious intellectual traditions” (“Islamic” philosophy, “Jewish” philosophy, “Christian philosophy”) are frivolous when you compare them to the rest of the world traditions. And the deep intellectual aspect of them all imitate each other. It’s literally like comparing Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Internet Explorer: every time one of them comes up with a new feature — say, tabbed browsing or (for religion) apophatic theology and Aniconism (Iconoclasts in the Protestant, Orthodox, Islamic, and Jewish traditions — why are we classifying them all so radically different?) — all of the other browsers (and religions) copy that, and make room for its features.
Why don’t we see these traditions for what they are in their organic, civilization-context? Why are we so caught up in the supreme arrogance of distinguishing ourselves from others with what is little more than words and symbols to designate our cool-kid-club from someone else’s cool-kid-club — when it’s actually just a small part of a greater intellectual tradition that has arisen under a narrow band of a certain threshold of Afroeurasian Civilization (*emphasis on Civilization, not so much Afroeurasia), which enables a diversity of permutations within that context of civilization?

^ THIS.
Everybody read this I’m on my phone and can’t type out a proper response so I’m just nodding a lot.

spittingonhegel:

ismael-sarepta:

spittingonhegel:

Now you guys can stfu about “the west”

It’s the bias of the written — bias of what’s been preserved — that has perverted our understanding of the history of philosophy. However, the Middle-Eastern tradition (not all of who were Arabs or even Muslim) once revered the ancient Greeks as much as the West does. This fact has accounted for why, say, Greek manuscripts have survived (and the oldest extant that survive are only from the 9th-13th centuries A.D.), and why manuscripts of pre-Islamic Persia, or pre-monotheistic Mesopotamia that dealt with the same subjects have not.

Not to mention how much the ancient Greeks had as their basis the wisdom traditions, technology, engineering, astronomy, medicine, spirituality, and philosophy of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Persia, Phoenicians/Carthaginians, and the Scythians! — Oh but how the Western scholars warp their own research with these self-confirming biases, and pigeon-holes these “wisdom traditions” as unphilosophical because they are apparently too theological or spiritual? Or maybe because they’re too goddamn lazy to actually study what they’re talking about.

And yet, the Greek tradition itself is ubiquitous with, what? — Socrates, prophet of the Sun-God, anyone? Pythagoreans and their mathematical-mysticism Cult? Plato’s entire philosophy? Plotinus!? This Enlightenment rhetoric and its sycophants need to stop projecting their vision of some hyper-rational, atheistic, post-French Revolution, Western-European Academic understanding of street philosophy back to ancient Greece, and see it for what it obviously was — freethinking discourses that covered everything under the sun in unprecedented levels of diversity.

And, before you jump on the bandwagon of, “oh, Islamic philosophy was so this and that before the West”, don’t. All you’ll be doing is reinforcing a new pigeon-holing of what so-called “Islamic philosophy” was supposed to be — restricted and defined by a religion’s particular tradition. “Islamic” philosophy was hardly anything Islamic — Ibn al-Rawandi’s borderline atheism; al-Razi’s criticism of the prophetic tradition; al-Ma’arri’s harsh ridicule of divinely revealed truth. Not to mention the influence of the teachers of al-Farabiibn Sina, al-Khwarazmi and ibn al-Hazm, who were Christians, Buddhists, Jews, atheists, pagans, Zoroastrians, etc,etc. Call “Islamic philosophy” what it really was — philosophy that was done in the Medieval Middle-Eastern / Eastern Mediterranean.

It’s time to throw out these pigeon-holes like “Islamic”, “Western”, and “Middle-Eastern” philosophy — and look at the big picture of a great intellectual tradition that has been kindled within conditions unique to Afroeurasian Civilization — in particular, the Eastern Mediterranean to the Oxus-Jaxartes.These designations of “religious intellectual traditions” (“Islamic” philosophy, “Jewish” philosophy, “Christian philosophy”) are frivolous when you compare them to the rest of the world traditions. And the deep intellectual aspect of them all imitate each other. It’s literally like comparing Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Internet Explorer: every time one of them comes up with a new feature — say, tabbed browsing or (for religion) apophatic theology and Aniconism (Iconoclasts in the Protestant, Orthodox, Islamic, and Jewish traditions — why are we classifying them all so radically different?) — all of the other browsers (and religions) copy that, and make room for its features.

Why don’t we see these traditions for what they are in their organic, civilization-context? Why are we so caught up in the supreme arrogance of distinguishing ourselves from others with what is little more than words and symbols to designate our cool-kid-club from someone else’s cool-kid-club — when it’s actually just a small part of a greater intellectual tradition that has arisen under a narrow band of a certain threshold of Afroeurasian Civilization (*emphasis on Civilization, not so much Afroeurasia), which enables a diversity of permutations within that context of civilization?

^ THIS.

Everybody read this I’m on my phone and can’t type out a proper response so I’m just nodding a lot.

74 notes   •   January 12 2013, 05:11 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#image   #words   #intellegence   #Europe   #Islam   #Middle East   #philosophy   

theelectricrelaxation:

we-are-revolting:

orientalismisalive:

shergawia:

Yawn.

Needs more anger. More mystery. 

Oh fuck you, media. That’s really all I have to say about this.

this made me chuckle 

1,946 notes   •   September 21 2012, 12:54 AM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#image   #words   #islam   #islamophobia   #Muslims   #media   #magazines   
saltandpepperedmango:

I like twitter’s response to Newsweek’s islamophobic cover. 

saltandpepperedmango:

I like twitter’s response to Newsweek’s islamophobic cover. 

3,318 notes   •   September 17 2012, 07:21 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#words   #image   #twitter   #Muslims   #islam   #islamophobia   

androphilia:

Mohammad Was Not a Womanizer, and Other Common Misconceptions About Islam Debunked | The Daily Beast

A virulently anti-Islam movie trailer sparked widespread protests across the Arab world and may have caused the death of a U.S. ambassador. But the truth about Islam is anything but hateful, writes Olga M. Davidson.

By Olga M. Davidson

September 13, 2012

1. Allah is not a name of a god. It is the Arabic word God, with a capital G, referring to the very same god that Christians and Jews worship. If you want to be very literal-minded it means “the god” because it is the definitive of the word “god” (ilah or ilāh), and if one adds the definitive article (al) it become Allah (Allāh, actually but let’s not quibble). In Farsi, God is called khodah—as in French, God is called Dieu, etc.

2. Mohammad isn’t a god. According to Islam, Mohammad is the final prophet, or messenger of God. He isn’t worshipped, since he isn’t God or an avatar of God. His example is emulated, but he is considered a real person, who eats, sleeps, loves, and so on. Islam has many prophets before Mohammad, including Abraham, Moses and Jesus and arguably Mary, because she spoke with God. Mohammad is just a man; progeny of human beings. In the Qur’ān it is clearly stated that God is neither begotten nor begets (lam yalid wa lam yūlad)

3. Speaking of Mary, mother of Jesus … she is considered to be among the finest of women and there is an entire surah, or chapter in the Qur’ān, entitled Maryam, the Arabic form of Mary. She is emulated because of her unwavering faith in God and her supreme spirituality. She becomes pregnant with Jesus, though a virgin, because God can do anything, but God is not considered to be the father.

4. Mohammad was not a womanizer. He married a widow, Khadijah, and was singularly devoted to her until she died. She left him with Fatima, their daughter. Upon her death, Mohammad did not want to remarry but was urged to do so by his followers. His subsequent marriages were primarily to form alliances with his nearest and dearest as well as with more remote followers. In the Sunni tradition, Aishah, daughter of Abu Bakr, was considered to be his favorite wife. She was married to him at a very early age and was consequently raised by him and was his only virgin bride. Her tender age was considered to be normal at the time, but marriages are not consummated until the bride has menstruated, just as in Game of Thrones. His other wives were either widows or divorcées. Mohammad wanted to form a tribe or ummah that was connected through faith, as opposed to blood ties. As this tribe grew, consolidating it through marriage ties was politically prudent. At the time, polygamy at was the norm in Arab tribal society and marrying widows and divorcées was a noble thing to do.

5. Women aren’t sold into marriage. Marriage and divorce in Islam have been greatly misunderstood. In Islam, marriage is a contract, not an oath. The groom has to give the bride a dowry to make the contract valid, and that dowry is for her and her alone to use as she wishes. Hence, her father or uncle or brother does not sell her. Unlike her Christian and Jewish sisters at the time, Muslim women could own property. As for divorce, it is not as simple as making a public declaration. Because marriage is a contract, dowry negotiations are taken very seriously; half the dowry is given at the marriage, while the second half has to be given if the bride asks for it or if the marriage is terminated through no fault of the bride. Furthermore, the groom needs to answer to the bride’s family of he wishes to terminate the contract. A bride can terminate the marriage if her husband is impotent or abusive; if he is an alcoholic or drug abuser; if he forces her to abandon her faith or act in a way that she deems as abandoning her faith; or if he disappears for over a year.  Marriage as contract, not an oath, is are meant to be fluid, and if a couple is not happy in living together, they can part from each other, remarry and continue to live normal lives.

6. Mohammad was not illiterate. The word Qur’ān means recitation, coming from the root q-r-, which means primarily to recite or declaim and then to read. If Mohammad is said to be illiterate, that is to underscore the importance of the spoken word, not the written word. The angel Gabriel gave the command form of q-r-, saying iqra’  , which means “recite!” in Arabic, when he transmitted the message of God as opposed to having something written on tablets. That is why memorizing the Qur’ān is so valued. Under Uthman, who was caliph from 644-656, the Qur’ān became a fixed text, as in it was written down as a finalized text and has not changed since. The style of the Qur’ān in Arabic is rhymed prose, so it is easier to memorize and is considered to be inimitable. The physical book as called a maṣḥaf (pronounced as maṣ-ḥaf), which means pages between two covers or a volume, but the value of those pages is in the recitation. When the Qur’ān became mass-produced, recitations of it were considered extremely reliable, to the great surprise of European editors.

7. You can’t be a Muslim if you don’t want to be. Contrary to the misnomer, “Islam or the Sword!”, the Qur’ān is quite clear about not forcing anyone to convert. Conversion must be done through the heart. It is simple because one just has to pronounce, with sincere intention, the shahida:  lā ilāh ilā allāh wa muhammad rasūlu’llāh ( “there is no god but God and Mohammad is his messenger”) three times in front of credible witnesses. Hence one comes to Islam from pure intention as opposed to being schooled by a priest, minister or rabbi.

8. You are unlikely to meet 72 virgins in heaven. The Qur’ān says nothing about 72 virgins waiting for you in heaven. Heaven is described, among other things, as the opposite of the harsh desert, hence it is verdant with the river or body of water, Kawthar, and filled with hūr al ayn, which means “ones with eyes that are very dark around the pupil”—a sign of true beauty. The concept of 72 virgins comes from outside of the Qur’ān.

9. Non-Muslims are not infidels. Christians and Jews—also Zoroastrians, for that matter—are considered to be ahl al kitāb or “people of the book,” because they are monotheists, and Islam is strictly monotheistic. References to infidels in the Qur’ān usually have to do with the Quraishi of Mecca, Mohammad’s own tribe, because they tried to kill him and destroy his following. Same would go for any Christian or Jewish tribe with the same intent.

Olga Merck Davidson earned her Ph.D. in 1983 from Princeton University in Near Eastern Studies. She is on the faculty of the Institute for the Study of Muslim Societies and Civilizations, Boston University, where she has served as Research Fellow since 2009. From 1992 to 1997, she was Chair of the Concentration in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at Brandeis University. Since 1999, she has been Chair of the Board, Ilex Foundation.

She is the author of two books: Poet and Hero in the Persian Book of Kings (Cornell University Press: Ithaca, 1994; 2nd ed. Mazda Press: Los Angeles, CA, 2006) and Comparative Literature and Classical Persian Poetry, Bibliotheca Iranica: Intellectual Traditions Series (Mazda Press: Los Angeles, CA, 2000), both of which have been translated into Persian and distributed in Iran.

Copyright © 2012 The Newsweek/Daily Beast Company LLC.

[Image: Indian Muslims offer Eid al-Fitr prayers at the Shahi Jama Masjid Mosque in the Walled City of Ahmedabad on August 20, 2012. (© Sam Panthaky, AFP/Getty Images)]

20,854 notes   •   September 15 2012, 01:36 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#words   #islam   #history   #islamophobia   #Muslims   

tariqbakobn:

ردًا على الفيلم المسيء لرسولنا الكريم علية افضل الصلاة والسلام
قامت جمعية (Discover Islam UK) في لندن
بتوزيع أكثر من 110.000 نسخة من القرآن المترجم،
 وسيرة النبي على المواطنين في لندن
 وهي ردة فعل ذكية وفقهم الله لنصرة الحبيب ودينه.

In response to the abusive film about the Holy Prophet Muhammad upon him blessings and peace,
“Discover Islam UK” in London
distributed more than 110,000 copies of a translation of the Qur’an
And the life of the Prophet Mohammed for the citizens of London.
Very smart response. May God bless them with the support of His beloved and religion.

3,957 notes   •   September 13 2012, 07:15 PM   •   VIA   •   SOURCE
#words   #islam   #islamophobia   #Religion