Nicole
she/her/hers
This blog is a little of everything and a lot of inconsistency. I am Queen of the Queue and over-tag everything, so don't be afraid to ask me to tag something for you. I am planning a hobbit hole and you should talk to me about your dream house. Also Tamora Pierce. And The Posterchildren. As well as anything that's weighing you down (I am nearly guaranteed to be on your side).
Profile picture courtesy of Raya

 

halfmeasured:

lilo and stitch: in 1 hr 25 min they show two sisters who have organic, natural fights that spring about from taking stress out on each other, taking grief out on each other, growing up too fast, loss, financial issues and issues with the law. show sisters overcome it with a scifi/fantasy element introduced in the series. sisters spend majority of movie together, their adventure is together and their love is proven through little acts throughout the entire series, even in how they deal with conflict, rather than spoonfed to the audience thru dramatic scenes and magic-induced conflict. dude love interest isn’t someone nani has barely known, he is a good supportive friend who takes an active role in caring for her sister.  nani does not in any way prioritize any crushy feelings for him over lilo or her own priorities in life and they also  never need to kiss or get a song together or have any overtly romantic stuff going on for people to see they’re special to each other.

frozen: I”’M SorRRY  i FUUCKked UP SO BAdd„ I’m TRSHASH.,.„  

(Source: cellulitisplayerhater)

isaia:

medievalpoc:

poc-creators:

Belle Director Amma Assante explains why she wanted to tell a Jane Austen Story with a Black Protagonist

Belle will be released in the US on May 2. 

Why did you decide to go the route of the Austenesque romance to tell her story?

In so many ways, it’s a romantic love story and it’s a paternal love story as well. It’s as much about her and [her surrogate father] Lord Mansfield, and also the fact that her biological father loved her as well.

It was much more practical in those days, if you had an illegitimate child of color, you could bring them into the household but had to keep them in the servant’s quarters, and have them work with servants where they’d be safe but wouldn’t be a full part of the family. The fact that her father decided that he didn’t want her to be brought up that way and brought her to his uncle [Lord Mansfield] and said, “Love her as I would had I been here,” was important to me.

When I did the research, it surprised me how many people had left Dido money in their will — Lord Mansfield left her money in his will [and] Lady Mary, Lord Mansfield’s sister, also left Dido in her will. The reality of it, then, was that so many people clearly [and] on paper showed their love for Dido that I thought it would have been disingenuous for me to tell a story purely about her suffering and a story that wasn’t about her love.

She had great love. That she married John Davinier, that she was able to baptize all of her children with him in the same church that they married in, I found that that was very romantic and beautiful.

I also wanted to understand, or communicate to the audience, what kind of men would love Dido during this period. Lord Mansfield, who adopted her, and also John [her husband] — what would make them so brave and so courageous enough to be able to love this woman of color during that period?

If I’m honest, I wanted to show a woman of color being loved. We don’t see it that often. I wanted to change the conversation a little bit, change the dialogue a little bit — we are loved, [and] we can be loved. Dido was valuable enough to be loved, she was worthy of being loved, and she was loved. Her challenge was showing people the right way to love her in the way that she needed to be. MORE

Belle Director Amma Asante on Challenging Stereotypes About Black Directors

Switching gears a bit, how did you make that transition from acting to directing?

I had been writing and producing for quite a while in British television. I wanted to circle my screenplays around some of the things that we’ve discussed — race, gender, and class — and I wasn’t sure that TV was the right place for me to do it.

I had written my first script, A Way of Life — which, thankfully, went on to do quite well critically, and won me a BAFTA and lots of other international awards — and I was very protective of it.

One day, one of my funders at the BFI called me in and said, “Hey. I know you would really like to produce this movie, and that’s all very well, but actually we’d love you to direct it.” I sort of shrunk back into the sofa and said, “No, no. That’s not something I can do. I’m a writer. What I do is write, and this is the best thing I’ve ever written to date, and I don’t want to be the person who ruins it by trying to direct it. This movie is my baby and I’m not going to kill it!”

They were very adamant and said, “Look. You’re not going to kill your movie. We’ll send you to film school for a month” — like a month of film school, what’s that? — “And we’re going to give you some money so that you can shoot a pilot of the movie. We want you do a couple of scenes so you get used to getting behind the camera then we want you to go off and make a movie.”

It took about a month to convince me, to get the courage to accept the offer. Off I went to film school and had one-to-one training with cinematographers, other directors, and editors — I literally had one to one time with all of the heads of department that you’ve have on a real movie, then I went off and shot a pilot. Then I thought, “Wow, I really like this.” Being able to create the characters and then see it through, it felt like, this is what I was born for. 

MORE

Awesome article on the upcoming film based on the life story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, a real noblewoman who lived in 1700s Scotland.

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i’m so excited!!!

cherrywoodworks:

These are my extremely quick “fan” made designs for the upcoming Disney movie “Moana”.
Stop. There is a reason why “fan” is in quotations.
I am not a fan. I am full of dread. Disney is about to tackle a Polynesian princess and that terrifies me.
For one, I am so angry at all of the fanmade designs I have seen. The sexy stereotyped Polynesian designs that somehow condenses hundreds of different cultures into a tube top and a a ti-leaf skirt.
Do you have any idea how offensive that is. That would be like making Mulan and saying “Hey she’s Asian, let’s throw her in a yukata”. Do you know how offensive it is that people think that Polynesian is a singular race? Hint: Massively.
I picked four cultures out of the vastness of Polynesia and each design is clearly different from the next. Each design is 100% endemic to the culture it is from, and it’s not even the tip of the iceberg.
We are not a homogenized area of the world. We have different languages, traditions, and ways of life. We are not all the same. We are not coconut bras and grass skirts. We never needed compasses. We are celestial navigators - it hasn’t died out. We journeyed across the Pacific using the stars and waves to guide us. We perfected aquaculture and sustainable living. Our heritages are rich and varied and beautiful.
We are not a tube top and a ti-leaf skirt. We are not an indistinguishable fabric swathed on brown bodies with random flowers in our hair. Stop fetishizing us! You have the internet at your discretion, and this is the best you can come up with?
Secondly, the fact that Moana will be dealing with mythology in Polynesia makes me want to crumple up and cry. It angers me to no end that people keep playing fast and loose with things they think are obsolete. Most of us still believe in our Gods (myself included). My family has a heiau, as recent as one generation ago my family has stories of conversing with Gods. Yet, people act like it’s fair game. Last I checked if anyone made retcons to the undead carpenter millions threw a shitfit, but because we are a marginalized people our beliefs are not allowed some respect?
It makes me angry and I won’t apologize for it. It makes me angry that when I call out other minorities for falsely portraying or marginalizing my culture (and the cultures of my fellow Polynesians) I get the “well I’m a minority too so I’m excused”. That is the worst offense, when people who should know better still treat you like an obsolete toy to be bandied about as characters.
We are indigenous people and we deserve respect. We deserve for people to care about our culture. For people to be afraid that the nightmare which created whitewashed Pocahontas might happen to us. If you call yourself an ally, or self-aware, I demand that you fear for us. I beg that you question what may happen in the wake of what Disney has been spewing out. Don’t be part of the base that turns Moana into nothing more than a token.
We were too young to stop Pocahontas from being made. We are not too young to afflict a change and prevent it from happening again. Signal boost my words, or write your own. Do something. Don’t let a movie go out across the world that could damage those that have already taken heavy hits. Don’t be compliant, don’t be silent. Don’t DO that I beg you. I am begging you on my knees, I grovel to you.
Don’t condense our cultures to an easy stereotype. Don’t let our stories become distorted for entertainment. Fight for good writing, fight for good designs. Fight for a movie you would be proud to watch. Give us something more than a rebellious teen who is Polynesian simply because they say she is.
Please. Please. With all my heart, a’ohe hana nui ka alu’ia. No task is too big when done together.

cherrywoodworks:

These are my extremely quick “fan” made designs for the upcoming Disney movie “Moana”.

Stop. There is a reason why “fan” is in quotations.

I am not a fan. I am full of dread. Disney is about to tackle a Polynesian princess and that terrifies me.

For one, I am so angry at all of the fanmade designs I have seen. The sexy stereotyped Polynesian designs that somehow condenses hundreds of different cultures into a tube top and a a ti-leaf skirt.

Do you have any idea how offensive that is. That would be like making Mulan and saying “Hey she’s Asian, let’s throw her in a yukata”. Do you know how offensive it is that people think that Polynesian is a singular race? Hint: Massively.

I picked four cultures out of the vastness of Polynesia and each design is clearly different from the next. Each design is 100% endemic to the culture it is from, and it’s not even the tip of the iceberg.

We are not a homogenized area of the world. We have different languages, traditions, and ways of life. We are not all the same. We are not coconut bras and grass skirts. We never needed compasses. We are celestial navigators - it hasn’t died out. We journeyed across the Pacific using the stars and waves to guide us. We perfected aquaculture and sustainable living. Our heritages are rich and varied and beautiful.

We are not a tube top and a ti-leaf skirt. We are not an indistinguishable fabric swathed on brown bodies with random flowers in our hair. Stop fetishizing us! You have the internet at your discretion, and this is the best you can come up with?

Secondly, the fact that Moana will be dealing with mythology in Polynesia makes me want to crumple up and cry. It angers me to no end that people keep playing fast and loose with things they think are obsolete. Most of us still believe in our Gods (myself included). My family has a heiau, as recent as one generation ago my family has stories of conversing with Gods. Yet, people act like it’s fair game. Last I checked if anyone made retcons to the undead carpenter millions threw a shitfit, but because we are a marginalized people our beliefs are not allowed some respect?

It makes me angry and I won’t apologize for it. It makes me angry that when I call out other minorities for falsely portraying or marginalizing my culture (and the cultures of my fellow Polynesians) I get the “well I’m a minority too so I’m excused”. That is the worst offense, when people who should know better still treat you like an obsolete toy to be bandied about as characters.

We are indigenous people and we deserve respect. We deserve for people to care about our culture. For people to be afraid that the nightmare which created whitewashed Pocahontas might happen to us. If you call yourself an ally, or self-aware, I demand that you fear for us. I beg that you question what may happen in the wake of what Disney has been spewing out. Don’t be part of the base that turns Moana into nothing more than a token.

We were too young to stop Pocahontas from being made. We are not too young to afflict a change and prevent it from happening again. Signal boost my words, or write your own. Do something. Don’t let a movie go out across the world that could damage those that have already taken heavy hits. Don’t be compliant, don’t be silent. Don’t DO that I beg you. I am begging you on my knees, I grovel to you.

Don’t condense our cultures to an easy stereotype. Don’t let our stories become distorted for entertainment. Fight for good writing, fight for good designs. Fight for a movie you would be proud to watch. Give us something more than a rebellious teen who is Polynesian simply because they say she is.

Please. Please. With all my heart, a’ohe hana nui ka alu’ia. No task is too big when done together.

Princess Leia still waiting for the force to come her way

(Source: rivkat)

burdge:

oldmanravenwood:

a scene that really bothers me in HBP is when Ginny feeds Harry that pie thing and she is like “don’t you trust me?” and then just feeds it to him all nicely 

because I honestly believe that book!Ginny would have said “don’t you trust me?” and then she would proceed to shove the pie in his face and then say “your mistake!” and just like run away laughing her head off and Harry would just be sitting there with pie stuck to his face and a small grin thinking ‘wow this girl is perfect’

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forgive me

(Source: gemdoyle)

galaxyspeaking:

Denise : a Supinfocom graduation movie, coming in 2014

Denise is the story of an obese young woman, going on a hiking trip to Easter Island. Despite her little ‘problem’ (she has trouble moving around, is easily exhausted, etc), she decides to walk through the island, and enjoy its beautiful landscapes and mysterious statues. Denise is a journey towards self acceptance and achievement.

Hey guys ! I realized recently that I kept telling you that I had a lot of work on my graduation project, but I never talked about it here on tumblr ! So here we are, Denise… I wrote the first script on my own almost 2 years ago, as well as the first concepts. Then, I had the chance to work with the best classmates I could ever wish for, so we’re now 6 working on Denise, co-directing it and trying to make the movie as beautiful and moving as possible !

So yeah, the original idea was by yours truly, and because of it, I’m the lead director, but I’m also in charge of all the visual developement and concepts annnd.. lead lighting artist.  Yup. total dictatorship going on here !

This movie will be done entirely in cg, with Autodesk Maya, but we’re trying to stick with the 2D look of the concepts I did ! And let me tell you it’s definitely a challenge >.< !

kyliesparks27:

theforestofthorns:

that-vicious-vixen:

itswalky:

221cbakerstreet:

The cast of The Princess Bride, reunited after 25 years.

people that I love

Prince Humperdinck’s pretty dashing.

I wonder how many people know that Prince Humperdinck=Jack Skellington.

I knew that!  And also the framed picture of Andre the Giant at the beginning. 

Cary Elwes will forever be able to get it.

ladycopsohot:

idjits-havethe-phone-box:

A moment of silence

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for all those

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awesome books

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with absolute shit movie adaptions

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We are so sorry that happened to you

it’s like the guy on the eragon poster just know how shitty it is

alittlebitofdisneymagic:

mystical-flute:

commanderelsa:

ivyonthefence:

gentlemen-wear-top-hats:

ok so i know how everyone thinks that the Queen of Corona and the Queen of Arendelle would be sisters, but what if the Queen of Corona and the King of Arendelle were siblings.

think about it, the queens don’t look that much alike except for their hair, but the King of Arendelle and the Queen of Corona do.

they have the same eyes (color and shape), same pursed lips, and their hair shows similar styles and waviness, along with graying in the same areas.  they look more alike than the two queens do.  

Elsa and Anna look nothing like Rapunzel (and every girl shows a striking resemblance to their mother)

the Queen of Arenedelle and the Queen of Corona actually don’t look alike at all.

just a thought, what do you think?

All this speculation could actually raise a valid point. Why was the king so worried about what people might do because of his daughter’s enchantment? Because his sister’s daughter had already been kidnapped for hers.

:-0

O_O

Head cannon accepted

"Elsa and Anna look nothing like Rapunzel."

Really?

Remember this?

(Source: professsorlayton)

girlwhowalkedtheearth:

I finally processed the information on the leads for the top 250 grossing films (I’m going to do 500 in all), and I have some really, really great facts:

  • Of the films, 209 starred a straight white man, or had a straight white male voice actor. This translates to 83.6% of all these films having a straight white male protagonist.
  • This left only 41 films with a protagonist who was a person of colour and/or woman (no films had an LGBTQ+ protagonist).  This translated to 16.4% of all the films. 
  • "So what? Straight white men are the majority group in America." a) no, the largest demographic group in America is actually technically straight white women, and b) not by 83.6% they fucking aren’t. 
  • If we look at American demographics (America is where these films are being made and mostly marketed for, after all) we find that only 31.3% of people in the USA are straight white men, while 68.7% are not. 
  • This means that 31.3% of the US population is recieving 83.6% of the representation, and the remaining 68.7% majority are squabbling over the remaining 16.4%. That’s unbelievably, amazingly shit. 

BUT: The world isn’t split into straight white men and everyone else, so let’s break this down further. Of the 41 films left over for the rest of us:

  • 10 starred a straight black man. (8 of these leads were played by Will Smith.), making up 2.5% of all the films. 
  • 26 starred a straight white woman, making up 10.4% of all the films.
  • 2 films starred straight South Asian men, making up 0.8% of the films.
  • 1 film starred an East Asian man and 1 starred a Middle Eastern man - 0.4% of the films each.
  • A grand total of ONE of the 250 highest grossing films of all time stars a woman of colour. Scraping in at number 242, and made in 1995, it’s Pocahontas; which is racist as fuck and demeans the memory of a real Native American woman. Fantastic. It’ll also probably have fallen out of the top 250 by the next year, while no other films with WoC leads seem likely to replace it.
  • This means that huge demographic groups are missing. 16.3% of people in the US identify as Latin@, and not a single film on this list has a Latin@ protagonist.
  • Roughly 10% of the US identifies as LGBT+. None of these films has a LGBTQ+ protagonist. 
  • The reason that these films are so high grossing is because of the marketing they recieve. Studios are putting all of their money into films with straight white men, preventing casting of women and people of colour and just generally fucking people over; but this isn’t any necessary indication of what people are willing to see at all. It’s worth noting that the single most successful actor on that list is Will Smith. People are clearly willing to pay out money to watch Will Smith doing stuff, and studios are backing this and enabling more and more films of Will Smith (and his son) doing more and more stuff. His popularity shows fairly clearly that cinemagoers are definitely willing to watch (and probably actively demanding of, seeing as people of colour and white women are more likely to go to the cinema) men of colour in film, and the success of franchises such as Twilight and The Hunger Games shows audiences backing white women (women of colour have yet to be given a real chance). As such, we can definitively say that this is especially a problem with Hollywood, and withe the people making these films - a problem which obviously needs to change.

Tl; dr: Representation in Hollywood is really, really shit. 

  • Straight white men are 31.3% of the population, 83.6% of the leads. Lucky bastards.
  • People of colour are 28.6% of the population, 6.4% of the leads (2.8% if you remove Will Smith, thanks Will.)
  • Women are 51% of the population, 10.8% of the leads. 
  • There’s no intersection here. If you’re a woman of colour, an LGBTQ+ woman and/or LGBTQ+ person of colour, then you’re getting fuck all.

(Source: mcyukimura)

The problem with false feminism

TW: Ableism Consistently the writer calls the main characters stupid, and their decisions idiotic. Also, it does not look like the writer is understanding that one of the main characters may be suffering from PTSD, and rather considers the steps the character takes to keep herself and others safe to be selfish.

serazienne:

brigidkeely:

theprettymundane:

Interesting look at “Frozen” and some of its themes and how it portrays them.

I don’t want Frozen to be good enough. I’ve spent more than enough words explaining why I think it spits in the face of what we should be thinking of as feminism, and how, like a schoolyard bully, it ennobles itself by mocking its predecessors. I don’t want to think that, when I perhaps have daughters some day, this is what I will be able to take them to see; still less do I want to think that the older, more progressive features will have been deemed irrelevant in favour of the new, Frozen-style model. I applaud the attempt to broaden the range of multi-faceted female characters in animation; I appreciate the intent of having two women in prominent roles instead of the usual one, but I want to see better. And the more effusive praise we heap on a movie that shouldn’t even be good enough, the less likely it is that better will ever happen.”

I disagree with the reading of Elsa for the most part. I think this brings up some really good points. It completely ignores any of the racism and white-washing about the film, so don’t think these are Frozen’s only problems. I still really like the film, though.

thegirlwiththemooglehat:

moreorlesstouched:

Rivendell vs Mirkwood

#hey guys let’s talk about apollonian vs maenad elves c’mon it’ll be fun     #for those who don’t know—the apollonian/dionysian divide is a literary thing     #where apollonian is individuality; the human form and creativity through reason and higher thinking     #and dionysian is wildness and madness; emotionality and intuition     #(they take their names from the greek god of light and poetry; and the god of madness and drinking respectively)     #anyway! I am convinced that Rivendell is meant to be our Apollonian stronghold; the house of light and reason     #of creativity—there’s a reason Bilbo longs to return there to complete his book     #but then we see Mirkwood—Mirkwood in the dark; beset by chaos from without and the madness of its king from within     #deliberately show drunken and reveling     #add that to the ”the elves of mirkwood are less wise more dangerous” line and you’re looking at a pretty obvious apollonian/dionysian divi     #and one that I love     #and I wish more fics played around with     (notbecauseofvictories)

(Source: princemaedhros)