Nicole
she/her/hers
This blog is a little of everything and a lot of inconsistency. I am Queen of the Queue and over-tag everything, so don't be afraid to ask me to tag something for you. I am planning a hobbit hole and you should talk to me about your dream house. Also Tamora Pierce. And The Posterchildren. As well as anything that's weighing you down (I am nearly guaranteed to be on your side).
Profile picture courtesy of Raya

 

Most of us were raised to think love is fire, passion, and prolonged bouts of giddiness and strained emotions. The quieter kind of love looks kinda boring on the surface, even cool-hearted. Nobody wants that at first. Some people never learn how wonderful it is to be friends with a lover or spouse, to know that here is someone you can be yourself around, and they will love you anyway, sometimes not in spite of your worse characteristics, but because of them. That kind of lover will stay with you through thick and thin, will make you feel valued always, and will make any disastrous occasion seem less so because you are with that person.

Tamora Pierce (source)

________________________________________________________________

I’m just rediscovering these books and this woman after about two and a half years of developing emotionally and personally (and falling in love). Turns out, hers are the books I want my future children (especially daughters) to read not just because they’re exciting and well-written, but because the characters make good value judgments and are good role models not just for how to behave, but how to treat others.

(via letmedicinebethyfood)

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

This sentence has five words. Here are five more words. Five-word sentences are fine. But several together become monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety. Now listen. I vary the sentence length, and I create music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested, I will engage him with a sentence of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of the cymbals—sounds that say listen to this, it is important.

Gary Provost (via compasscross)

(Source: qmsd)

My pain is mine, and it’ll always be a part of my identity. But that doesn’t mean I can’t feel wonderful things now. It doesn’t mean I can’t have incredible friends. It doesn’t mean I can’t fall in love with a beautiful man. It doesn’t mean I can’t gain satisfaction from writing my words down for others to read. No, it just means that the past hurts. Remembering it hurts. But I am here now because I survived it, and that’s a bit of self-worth that no one can take from me. I survived.

Mark Oshiro, markreads.net (via profanefame)

Help me decide on a senior quote?

So I have two in mind (well, I did have about sixteen but had to do some very painful elimination):

It is likely I will die next to a pile of things I was meaning to read. – Lemony Snicket

and

The beauty of a living thing is not the atoms that go into it but the way those atoms are put together. – Carl Sagan

Although I can’t find a proper source for the Snicket quote. So maybe I won’t use that.

Honorable mention to “Sleep is good and books are better.” – George R.R. Martin, which was ultimately struck from the list because I’m not entirely sure I like GRRM.

Also: “Forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the winds long to play with your hair.” – Khalil Gibran, which is absolutely gorgeous and I’m in love with it, but I don’t actually know anything about Gibran and felt uncomfortable using it because of that.

I am tired, not of arguing in favour of equality, diversity and tolerance, but of having to explain, over and over and over again, why such arguments are still necessary, only to have my evidence casually dismissed by someone too oblivious to realise that their dismissal of the problem is itself a textbook example of the fucking problem. I am tired of being mocked by hypocrites who think that a single lazy counterexample is sufficient to debunk the fifteen detailed examples they demanded I produce before they’d even accept my point as a hypothetical, let alone valid, argument. I am tired of assholes who think that playing Devil’s Advocate about an issue alien to their experience but of deep personal significance to their interlocutor makes them both intellectually superior and more rationally objective on the specious basis that being dispassionate is the same as being right (because if they can stay calm while savagely kicking your open wound, then clearly, you have no excuse for screaming).

Foz Meadows from I Am So Very Tired in shattersnipe: malcontent & rainbows October 4, 2013 (via nonmono-perspective)

"ON THE SPECIOUS BASIS THAT BEING DISPASSIONATE IS THE SAME AS BEING RIGHT"
ugh bless this

(via accidentalmelodrama)

because if they can stay calm while savagely kicking your open wound, then clearly, you have no excuse for screaming

holy shit, yes. wow.

(via liamdryden)

(Source: morecoffee)

I suppose earlier generations had to sit through all this huffing and puffing with the invention of television, the phone, cinema, radio, the car, the bicycle, printing, the wheel and so on, but you would think we would learn the way these things work, which is this:

1) everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal;

2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it;

3) anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it’s been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.

Apply this list to movies, rock music, word processors and mobile phones to work out how old you are.

Douglas Adams :: How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet

douglas adams writing about technology in 1999.

(via bananaleaves)

(Source: ultralaser)

The stories never said why [the witch] was wicked. It was enough to be an old woman, enough to be all alone, enough to look strange because you had no teeth. It was enough to be called a witch.

If it came to that, the book never gave you the evidence of anything. It talked about “a handsome prince”…was he really, or was it just because he was a prince that people called him handsome? As for “a girl who was beautiful as the day was long”…well, which day? In midwinter it hardly ever got light! The stories didn’t want you to think, they just wanted you to believe what you were told…

The Wee Free Men, Terry Pratchett (via zeeblebeeble)

If there is a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world, it is the United States of America. They don’t care for human beings.

Nelson Mandela

Remembering the unvarnished truth of Mandela’s words means refusing to let anybody sanitize his legacy. As the United States attempts to piggyback on Mandela’s revolutionary spirit, never forget that it was the CIA who helped jail him for 28 years. His sentiments toward our imperialist government reflect what our government remorselessly tries to keep we citizens from seeing, that indeed ”…the United States now feels that they are the only superpower in the world and they can do what they like" regardless of who we harm in the process.  

Here are a few more quotes we are unlikely to see in the mainstream press: 

“When a man is denied the right to live the life he believes in, he has no choice but to become an outlaw.”

"A critical, independent and investigative press is the lifeblood of any democracy. The press must be free from state interference. It must have the economic strength to stand up to the blandishments of government officials. It must have sufficient independence from vested interests to be bold and inquiring without fear or favor. It must enjoy the protection of the constitution, so that it can protect our rights as citizens."

"It is said that no one truly knows a nation until one has been inside its jails. A nation should not be judged by how it treats its highest citizens, but its lowest ones.”

“Overcoming poverty is not a task of charity, it is an act of justice. Like Slavery and Apartheid, poverty is not natural. It is man-made and it can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings. Sometimes it falls on a generation to be great. YOU can be that great generation. Let your greatness blossom.”

“We know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians.”

“No single person can liberate a country. You can only liberate a country if you act as a collective.”

"If the United States of America or Britain is having elections, they don’t ask for observers from Africa or from Asia. But when we have elections, they want observers."

(Read more courtesy of Common Dreams here)

(Source: america-wakiewakie)

There are some themes, some subjects, too large for adult fiction; they can only be dealt with adequately in a children’s book.

The reason for that is that in adult literary fiction, stories are there on sufferance. Other things are felt to be more important: technique, style, literary knowingness. Adult writers who deal in straightforward stories find themselves sidelined into a genre such as crime or science fiction, where no one expects literary craftsmanship.

But stories are vital. Stories never fail us because, as Isaac Bashevis Singer says, “events never grow stale.” There’s more wisdom in a story than in volumes of philosophy. And by a story I mean not only Little Red Riding Hood and Cinderella and Jack and the Beanstalk but also the great novels of the nineteenth century, Jane Eyre, Middlemarch, Bleak House and many others: novels where the story is at the center of the writer’s attention, where the plot actually matters. The present-day would-be George Eliots take up their stories as if with a pair of tongs. They’re embarrassed by them. If they could write novels without stories in them, they would. Sometimes they do.

But what characterizes the best of children’s authors is that they’re not embarrassed to tell stories. They know how important stories are, and they know, too, that if you start telling a story you’ve got to carry on till you get to the end. And you can’t provide two ends, either, and invite the reader to choose between them. Or as in a highly praised recent adult novel I’m about to stop reading, three different beginnings. In a book for children you can’t put the plot on hold while you cut artistic capers for the amusement of your sophisticated readers, because, thank God, your readers are not sophisticated. They’ve got more important things in mind than your dazzling skill with wordplay. They want to know what happens next.

Philip Pullman, born October 19, 1946

Exceedingly apropos of my last reblog, and also just some Basic Truth.

———-

That’s a pretty sick burn on literary fiction, Philip Pullman. Four for you.

(via jkateel)

(Source: annaverity)

"When I was that age, I listened to my elders," Onua muttered, conveniently forgetting she had done no such thing.

Wild Magic, by Tamora Pierce (via muchtoofullofsand)

We are the girls with anxiety disorders, filled appointment books, five-year plans. We take ourselves very, very seriously. We are the peacemakers, the do-gooders, the givers, the savers. We are on time, overly prepared, well read, and witty, intellectually curious, always moving … We pride ourselves on getting as little sleep as possible and thrive on self-deprivation. We drink coffee, a lot of it. We are on birth control, Prozac, and multivitamins … We are relentless, judgmental with ourselves, and forgiving to others. We never want to be as passive-aggressive are our mothers, never want to marry men as uninspired as our fathers … We are the daughters of the feminists who said, “You can be anything,” and we heard, “You have to be everything.”

Courtney Martin, from Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters 

(via hermionejg)

We are the daughters of the feminists who said, “You can be anything,” and we heard, “You have to be everything.”

(via left-hand-song)

This basically describes me to a T 

(via tittianamaslany)

(Source: confessonidebelle)